How journal for the Planet works

Overview

Journal for the Planet (JFTP) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit public charity organization incorporated in the United States of America (status in process).

Journal for the Planet aims to provide a medium that researchers of all disciplines and organizations can leverage to provide policy makers and global citizens the science they need to better understand and solve the environmental issues of our time.

The Journal exclusively publishes the most rigorous science relevant to the current environmental crisis.

All submissions are subject to a rigorous peer-review process and made available transparently at publication.

Journal for the Planet works closely with authors to ensure that all published articles are best equipped to inform policy makers and global citizens. This includes the addition of impact statements as well as rich and interactive explorable explanations.

Submissions to Journal for the Planet are free of charge (no APC) and made available for free (open access).

Publishing principles

StageDescription

Submission Stage

  • Author submits manuscript
  • Author makes relevant declarations and disclosures
  • Editors decide to send article to review or reject the submission

Review Stage

  • Article is reviewed by a defined number of reviewers
  • Based on the reviews, the editor decides to
    • Ask for a revision
    • Request additional reviews (send back to review stage)
    • Reject the submission
    • Accept the submission (send to production stage)

Revision stage

  • Author submits a revision
  • Editor decides to:
    • Request more reviews (send back to review stage)
    • Reject the submission
    • Accept the submission (send to production stage)

Production stage

  • Members of the technical committee review the article and suggest enhancements that need to be approved by the authors
  • A member of the board of directors schedules the article for publication
Optional

To meet the criteria for publication in Journal for the Planet, submissions must address critical environmental issues and provide actionable results, intelligible to a broad audience of peers and policy makers.

Articles are published according to the following process:

At submission authors select:

  • An article type and associated editorial workflow from a list of eligible workflows for the selected type
  • An optional request for articles (RFA) that the article is in response to
  • The editor best suited to handle the article

The editor is in charge of orchestrating the peer review process formally defined in the editorial workflow. At a minimum, this typically involves recruiting additional reviewers and / or editors as well as members of the technical committee. The technical committee is in charge of assessing if web technologies and design can be used to maximize the impact and content of the article.

At the end of this process, accepted submissions are published along with the full editorial workflow, including peer reviews, while respecting well defined anonymity settings.

Publication Types

Publication types are defined by the journal board of directors with the intent to cover the following categories:

Observations
Research articles
Review Articles
Plans of action

Request for articles and publication issues

As a bridge between science and policy, Journal for the Planet encourages policy makers (both public and private) to submit Requests For Articles (RFAs) on subjects that impact the environment. With this approach, the journal aims to produce a positive feedback cycle between research and action.

Additionally, Journal for the Planet may issue its own requests for articles to encourage author submissions on a particular subject or addressing a specific priority area. Requests for articles and publication issues are proposed by the board of directors and subject to approval (see voting below for more on the approval process).

Peer Review Blinding Options

EditorsReviewersAuthors

Editors

Reviewers

Authors

VisibleConfigurable

The blinding of each role, respective to every other role, is customizable according to the workflow.

Editorial workflows and anonymity settings

Each publication type comes with one or more eligible editorial workflows. Editorial workflows are formally specified ahead of time, enabling authors and readers to benefit from a greater level of transparency. All workflows are designed by the journal board of directors and subject to approval (vote) prior to being made available to authors.

Editorial workflows are usually defined around variations of the structure defined in the table below.

Each editorial workflow is made available under several different anonymity settings controlling who can view the identity of whom during the peer review process and after publication.

During the peer review process, the following anonymity options are available:

  • Open peer review (editors, reviewers and authors know each other’s identities
  • Single blind peer review (authors do not know the identity of the reviewers)
  • Double blind peer review (reviewers do not know the identity of authors, and vice versa)
  • Triple blind peer review (editors, reviewers and authors do not know each other’s identities)
  • Custom peer review (custom specification of a “who can view identity of whom” matrix)

Typical Double-Blind Workflow

Authors

Blinding

Editors

Blinding

Reviewer

Blinding

Producer

Blinding

Public

Submission Stage

Review Stage

Production

A diagram of a standard double-blind workflow. In this example, authors and reviewers cannot view each other's idenity. Furthmore, the reviewers' identities have been blinded from the producers, but unblinded in the public release.

Post Publication Anonymity Options

EditorsReviewersAuthors

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Publicanonymized

For published articles, the following 8 different anonymity options are available:

  1. All identities are made public upon publication
  2. Authors are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  3. Reviewers are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  4. Editors are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  5. Authors and reviewers are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  6. Authors and editors are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  7. Reviewers and editors are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication
  8. Author, reviewers and editors are anonymized (or kept anonymized) upon publication

Making workflows available under different anonymity settings enables authors to choose the anonymity setting most suitable for their submission.

Governance and roles

The journal operates on the principles of government by merit (meritocracy), with reviewers and editors at its core. The journal operating model is inspired by the National Academy of Sciences and the Apache Software Foundation.

Reviewers

Anyone can apply to be a reviewer for Journal for the Planet. To qualify, applicants must have at least 1 accepted publication in a peer reviewed journal.

Reviewers are remunerated at the end of each year based on the number of articles reviewed and a per-article payment determined by the board of directors.

Having an affiliation at a qualifying organization ensures that an editor is experienced working at the interface of science and society.

Editors

Reviewers who meet the additional criteria below can apply to join the editorial board. Editorial board membership is subject to approval (vote) by the board of directors. Eligibility criteria to apply for editorial board membership includes:

  • One or more completed reviews as reviewer for Journal for the Planet, and
  • One or more affiliations with a qualifying organization, either through publication or proof of employment (past or present)

Having an affiliation at a qualifying organization ensures that an editor is experienced working at the interface of science and society. A list of qualifying organizations can be found on Journal for the Planet website.

Editors are responsible for supervising the peer review process of submissions and making the final decision for every submission. Editors are remunerated at the end of each year based on the number of articles managed and a per-article payment determined by the board of directors.

Board of directors

Editors who have edited one or more publications for Journal for the Planet are eligible to apply to join the board of directors. Board membership is subject to approval (vote) by the existing board of directors.

Responsibilities of the board of directors includes to:

  • Edit and create editorial workflows (majority vote required)
  • Propose Requests for Articles (RFAs) (majority vote required)
  • Organize articles into issues and special issues (majority vote required)
  • Vote on editor applications (majority vote required)
  • Vote on reviewer and editor remunerations (majority vote required)
  • Vote on the composition and budget of the technical committee (majority vote required)
  • Elect the officers of the corporation

Roles are additive, i.e., a member of the board of directors also has editor and reviewer status for the journal. Members of the board of directors do not receive further remuneration beyond what is granted by their editor and reviewer status.

Officers of the corporation and technical committee

Officers of the corporation and technical committee are appointed by the board of directors. The corporation and technical committees provide resources in legal, branding, fundraising, and journal technical infrastructure and operations.

Vote

When coordination is required, decisions are taken with a lazy consensus approach: a few positive votes with no negative vote is enough to proceed.

To ensure editorial and corporate independence, financial donors are not part of corporate governance of the journal.

Funding

Journal for the Planet relies on three sources of funding to ensure that all published articles are free of charge (no APC) and made available for free (open access). This includes:

  • Direct donation
  • In-kind donations of technical infrastructure supporting the journal
  • Pledges of annual donations and other sponsorship actively pursued by the Journal

To ensure editorial and corporate independence, financial donors are not part of corporate governance of the journal. Making a donation does not give an individual or an organization or its employees any specific merit within the journal or any submissions to the journal. Donors are always recognized by Journal for the Planet, with their name and logo (if applicable) displayed on the journal website and promotional material.

The use of funds is strictly voted on by the board of directors and distributed among the following: journal infrastructure, editor and reviewer remuneration, corporate officer salaries, and technical committee salaries as determined by the board of directors.